Travel Guide: Buenos Aires2021-03-02T16:27:43-08:00

BUENOS AIRES

BUENOS AIRES

Buenos Aires, Argentina

The Argentine capital city of Buenos Aires, with its architecture that resembles and rivals that of Paris, is a distinct reminder that Argentina is a country with the ancestors of three million Europeans immigrants. For a people with strong European cultural ties, Argentina has become a country with its own distinct personality. It is a country all its own.

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Avenida de Mayo Neighborhood

Avenida de Mayo runs approximately one mile between Plaza de Mayo and the Casa Rosada to Plaza de Congreso. En route you will cross the widest avenue in the world – Avenida de Julio – which is made up of seven lanes of traffic running in either direction.

Torcuato de Alvear, the first mayor of Buenos Aires, envisioned a street in Buenos Aires that would rival those in Paris. After nine years of construction, Avenida de Mayo was inaugurated on July 9, 1894.

The 154-year-old Cafe Tortoni is the oldest coffee shop in Argentina. It is located at Avenida de Mayo 825 near Avenida de Julio.

Plaza de Mayo

Situated at the base of Avenida de Mayo, Plaza de Mayo was the scene of a revolution that led to independence of Argentina from Spain.

Map of Avenida de Mayo

Follow the route of Avenida de Mayo beginning at Plaza de Mayo and ending at Plaza del Congreso in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

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Av Saenz Pena (Diagonal Norte) y Florida Street – Buenos Aires, Argentina

Get a view of the busy pedestrian intersection of Florida Street and Av Roque Saenz Pena (Diagonal Norte) in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Plaza de Mayo – 360° Panorama – Buenos Aires, Argentina

La Casa Rosada, Catedral Metropolitana de Buenos Aires, Piramide de Mayo, Buenos Aires Cabildo, Avenida de Mayo and Diagonal Sur.

Buenos Aires Subway Line A (old carriages)

Buenos Aires Metro – Take a ride on the historic old wooden carriages that ran under Avenida de Mayo in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 1913 – 2013. The old carriages were replaced with new cars in March 2013.

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